Announcing a "Giornata di studi": Italian Identities: Dialects, Minorities, Literatures

Author: Charles Leavitt

Italian Studies at Notre Dame announces the “giornata di studi” Italian Identities: Dialects, Minorities, Literatures. This one-day conference will investigate the connections between the modern anthropological and sociological context of Italy and the use of dialects. The conference will focus in particular on how literature has responded to both the ever-present issue of the uneven economic development and the crisis of the so-called Italian identity in the last thirty years.  In order to achieve its goals, our one-day symposium will be divided in three main panels, each one dedicated to exploring the topic from a specific – linguistic, socio-anthropological and more purely literary – perspective.…

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Announcing the Spring 2012 Italian Film Series

Author: Charles Leavitt

Italian Studies at Notre Dame announces the official launch of this year's series of "Italian Film Nights," whose theme is "Rome in the Cinema." The "Italian Film Nights," which are in their 8th year of existence, are intended to give students enrolled in Italian courses additional opportunities for enrichment in and out of the classroom. The films of the Fall semester provided a historic progression of events in the city of Rome, while the films of the Spring semester will portray more contemporary themes.…

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The Snite Museum of Art presents A Grand Flourish: Drawings of Architectural Ornament from the Permanent Collection beginning January 15, 2012.

Author: Charles Leavitt

Organized by art history graduate student Elizabeth Peterson, this focus exhibition explores the decorative principles established in Italy by the Renaissance humanist and architect Leon Battista Alberti (1401–72) and their dissemination to France in subsequent centuries.

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Italian Studies at Notre Dame Announces The Primo Levi Collection

Author: Charles Leavitt

This collection includes virtually all first editions of Levi’s works published within his lifetime as well as first editions of notable translations of Levi's writings that document his importance outside of Italy. Also present are first editions of Levi’s own efforts as a translator of both literary and non-literary works.

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All Roads Lead to Rome: New acquisitions relating to the Eternal City

Author: Charles Leavitt

All Roads Lead to Rome: New acquisitions relating to the Eternal City The proverb "All roads lead to Rome" derives from medieval Latin. It was first recorded in writing in 1175 by Alain de Lille, a French theologian and poet, whose Liber Parabolarum…

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Notre Dame Announces Italian Studies Research Seminars

Author: Charles Leavitt

Italian Studies Research Seminars 2011-12 Fall Semester 15 September: Theodore J. Cachey (Notre Dame), “Cartographic Petrarch” 6 October: Francesco Ciabattoni (Georgetown), “Dante's Musical Journey: from Unholy Racket to Heavenly Polyphony” 17 November: Graduate seminar: (i) Beatrice Priest (Cambridge/Notre Dame): “Mary on Mount Purgatory: Young Mother or Virtuous Exemplar” & (ii) Emily Gandolfi (Notre Dame), “Rolandino of Padua’s Chronicle of the Trevisian March”…

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Exhibition: Palladio and His Legacy: A Transatlantic Journey

Author: Charles Leavitt

This exhibition at the Snite Museum of Art offers a rare opportunity to see thirty-one drawings by the famous 16th-century architect, Andrea Palladio, along with seven books, fifteen models of related buildings, and eight bas-reliefs of some of the drawings (3-D projections of architectural drawings).

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New Exhibit - Exercises in Creativity: Italian Drawings, 1500-1800

Author: Charles Leavitt

The Snite Museum of Art announces the opening of Exercises in Creativity: Italian Drawings, 1500-1800 April 3. This exhibition will provide visitors with an opportunity to gain deeper insights into some of Italy’s best-known masters, including Agostino Carracci, Sebastiano Ricci, and Jacopo Tintoretto. Less familiar artists who are equally representative of the social, political, or theological contexts that gave rise to these “exercises in creativity” will also be included.

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Leading Dante expert comes to Notre Dame

Author: Charles Leavitt

  One of the world’s leading Dante scholars, Zygmunt G. Baranski, is slated to join the University of Notre Dame faculty next fall as the University’s first Notre Dame Professor of Dante and Italian Studies. Baranski comes to Notre Dame from the University of Cambridge, where, since 2002, he has been the Serena Professor of Italian and, between 2002 and 2006, head of the Department of Italian in the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages. “I feel that Notre Dame is exactly the right place for me to be going at this point in my career,” Baranski says.

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Notre Dame team completes 3D Documentation of the Roman Forum

Author: Charles Leavitt

In July, a team of School of Architecture faculty and students led by Professor Krupali Uplekar Krusche traveled to the Roman Forum---the center of political, religious, commercial, and judicial life in Rome---to measure, document, and draw large areas of the historic site. The team used conventional and innovative methods, including a Leica 3-D laser scanner, for measuring and understanding this World Heritage Site.

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Zygmunt G. Baranski joins Notre Dame as the 2010 Albert J. and Helen M. Ravarino Distinguished Visiting Professor

Author: Charles Leavitt

Serena Professor of Italian and Head of the Department of Italian in the Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages at Cambridge University, is joining Notre Dame as the 2010 Alberto J. and Helen M. Ravarino Distinguished Visiting Professor of Dante and Italian Studies.

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"All Roads Lead to Rome" — Office of Research Awards Two Grants to New Italian Studies Program

Author: Charles Leavitt

The University of Notre Dame is home to an impressive number of scholars whose research and teaching focus on Italy. Now, thanks to support from the College of Arts and Letters and two grants awarded by the Office of Research, the University will further extend its engagement with that country in the form of an interdisciplinary program in Italian studies.

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Law professor Carozza organizes amicus effort in European crucifix case

Author: Charles Leavitt

Notre Dame Professor of Law Paolo Carozza is leading a group of more than 50 law professors from 15 countries who have submitted written comments asking the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights to overturn a seven-judge panel’s ruling that crucifixes may not be displayed in Italian classrooms.

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In Italy’s ruined Abruzzo, architects envision a traditional future

Author: Charles Leavitt

A group of students at Notre Dame’s School of Architecture  spent the past autumn semester drafting plans for rebuilding San Gregorio, a town of roughly 700 where 95 percent of the buildings were damaged, most of them beyond repair. The class visited San Gregorio with Professor Samir Younés in August 2009, four-and-a-half months after the quake. Returning to Bond Hall last August, the students — all in their fifth and final year — began work on plans for rebuilding San Gregorio. They spent the first half of the semester collectively drafting a master plan to rebuild the town, incorporating buildings they deemed salvageable along with new construction in the traditional local style. The rest of semester they worked individually on particular buildings.

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Teaching awards honor exemplary work with undergraduates

Author: Charles Leavitt

Twenty University of Notre Dame faculty members have received Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C., Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and three faculty were honored with Dockweiler Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. This year's recipients include Professor Robert Randolf Coleman, art history.

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Professor receives award for fostering "humane values"

Author: Charles Leavitt

Steven Semes, director of the Rome Studies Program, has been named the 2010 recipient of the Clem Labine Award. Sponsored by Restore Media, publisher of Traditional Building and Period Homes magazines, the Labine Award goes to the person who has done the most to “foster humane values in the built environment.”

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Classics students use Rome as classroom for a week

Author: Charles Leavitt

Keith Bradley, Eli J. and Helen Shaheen Professor of Classics, took his students on a weeklong trip to the ancient city as part of “Literature and Empire: The Roman Experience”—a course he taught for the first time this fall to a group of upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. Students in the seminar explored major works of literature from the Roman imperial era including such texts as Virgil’s “Aeneid,” Lucan’s “Civil War,” and Tacitus’ “Annals.” They examined the political and ideological contexts in which the works were written and how the authors expressed reactions to the harsh and repressive form of autocratic government that the Roman emperorship embodied.

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Colloquium to explore influence of the Eternal City

Author: Charles Leavitt

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture will host a two-day colloquium, “Learning from Rome: The Influence of the Eternal City on Art, Architecture, and the Humanities” Feb. 5 and 6 (Friday and Saturday) in Bond Hall. Scholars from the School of Architecture; Department of Romance Languages and Literatures; Department of English; Department of Art, Art History and Design; and the Department of History will discuss the intersections of their disciplines and how Rome remains an essential pillar of each curriculum.

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The Snite Museum of Art to Exhibit "The World of Piranesi"

Author: Charles Leavitt

The Snite Museum of Art. at Notre Dame University announces the exhibition The World of Piranesi on view from January 17 through February 28, 2010. A multi-disciplinary approach to learning will be presented in this exhibition of ten etchings by Giovanni-Battista Piranesi 1720-1778, particularly directed towards students of Italian and architecture.

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Architecture colloquium to explore historic preservation

Author: Charles Leavitt

The University of Notre Dame’s School of Architecture will host a colloquium titled “The Role of Traditional Architecture and Historic Preservation in Today’s Cities” from 5 to 7 p.m. Sept.16 (Wednesday) in 104 Bond Hall. Case studies will be presented by key Notre Dame School of Architecture faculty, including professors John Stamper and Krupali Uplekar. 

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Law School’s Professor Carozza reports on human rights in Honduras

Author: Charles Leavitt

Paolo Carozza, associate professor of law at the University of Notre Dame Law School, recently returned from a weeklong fact-finding mission in Honduras. He was there as part of an Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) delegation to observe that nation’s human rights situation following a June 28 coup d’etat that led to the ousting of Honduran President Manuel Zelaya.

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Notre Dame historian moonlights as consultant for video game

Author: Charles Leavitt

Margaret Meserve's expertise in the Italian Renaissance and the urban histories of Florence and Rome landed her in the somewhat unlikely position of advising a group of video game developers in the creation of Assassin’s Creed 2, an adventure game set in Renaissance Italy, where assassins, nobles and merchants battle it out for land and fortunes, all the while navigating a world of conspiracies, secrets and hidden code books.

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Choice Magazine selects Dante volume as outstanding academic title

Author: Charles Leavitt

The most recent volume in the University of Notre Dame’s Devers series in Dante studies has been placed on Choice Magazine’s highly regarded list of Outstanding Academic Titles for 2008.This is the third time the series has been honored by Choice. “The Ancient Flame: Dante and the Poets,”the ninth volume in the series, was authored by Winthrop Wetherbee of Cornell University, and edited by Christian Moevs, associate professor of Romance languages and literatures and fellow of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute, and Theodore Cachey, professor of Romance languages and literatures.

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